12 December 2016

PROJECT 12B: Still Life, Part 2 (Food, cutlery...)

DIRECTIONS: Using your lightbox, choose FOOD as your subject matter. The food is your choice. Be clever and unexpected with the set-up and arrangement, and as with 13A vary the placement of your lights to create distinctly different images.





01 December 2016

EXPOSURE TRIANGLE

WHAT IS EXPOSURE?



APERTURE



SHUTTER SPEED



ISO


EXPOSURE TRIANGLE





SHUTTER SPEED:




APERTURE SIZE:



30 November 2016

WED, Nov 30

Your to-do list:

1. Finish developing, posting, and writing your statement for the "Dream" photographs.
2. Develop and post your weekend photographs (these were of your own choosing).
3. Sign your matted image (I'll call you in for this).


HW: Night Glow long exposure images of lights.

For Friday:
All "Dream" photos, captions, & written explanation posted to blog BEFORE 7th period.

15 November 2016

The Dream (3-5)

TITLE___________________________



1. Caption each photo.
2. Develop each photo w/...
3. Paragraph/statement/blurb about your dream theme, the story, or something
that gives us further insight. 

Developing & Posting "Dreams"



Developing:
1. B/W or color.
2. Developed using exposure, curves, brightness, contrast, etc. (what else you do is up to you, but keep in mind it should enhance your dream story)

Posting:
1. Title your dream/story.
2. Place the title at the top of the post as a "HEADING."
3. Place the images in the post from first to last (as they would be in the story/dream).
4. Caption each photo with something other than the title of the dream.
5. Under each photo, describe what your intent was for making the photo as you did. (i.e. explain symbolism, meaning, thoughts, how it ties in to the overall dream, etc.).
6. Write this as a paragraph or two using pronouns "I", "my dream is...", etc.



STUDIUM: (The symbolic meaning and interest in a photo) Denotes the cultural, linguistic, and political interpretation of a photograph. Basically, it is the element that creates interest in a photographic image. It shows the intention of the photographer. We experience this intention in reverse because we're the viewer. We are charged with having to find the meaning. The photographer thinks of the idea/intent, and we as the viewers act in the opposite way, interpreting the photograph and attempting to figure out meaning.

PUNCTUM: (The object or thing that stands out in a photo) Denotes the personally touching detail which establishes a direct relationship with the object or person within it. Essentially, it is a small detail that jumps out at the viewer as special and important.

01 November 2016

PROJECT #11: Dream(s) (DIGITAL)

The words studium & punctum come from a book about reading photographs by a French philosopher named Roland Barthes. In the book he reflects on the complex relationships between meaning, society, culture, and subjectivity when looking at images.

STUDIUM: (The symbolic meaning and interest in a photo) Denotes the cultural, linguistic, and political interpretation of a photograph. Basically, it is the element that creates interest in a photographic image. It shows the intention of the photographer. We experience this intention in reverse because we're the viewer. We are charged with having to find the meaning. The photographer thinks of the idea/intent, and we as the viewers act in the opposite way, interpreting the photograph and attempting to figure out meaning.

PUNCTUM: (The object or thing that stands out in a photo) Denotes the personally touching detail which establishes a direct relationship with the object or person within it. Essentially, it is a small detail that jumps out at the viewer as special and important.

Andre Kertesz, 1921 - Tristan Tzara, Paris

Here's an example from the book. He mentions that he thinks this photograph is well composed, and has good value, shape, and line. But the element that draws him in - the punctum - is the dirt under Tzara's fingernails.
*********************************************************************

DIRECTIONS FOR THE PROJECT: 
Make a group of photographs (8-10 minimum) that tell the story of a dream. The kind of dream is up to you.  Of course, make well-exposed images, but remember that the project is as much about the IDEA(s) and story that you tell through the photographs.

We will edit the final images down to 3-5 final images that tell the story. Yes, you will make more photos than needed, but by doing so you give yourself more options from which to choose the BEST TOLD story.

*We will be printing between 3-5 images for display.

How will you get inspired to create a dream sequence through photographs? 
Think: odd, unusual, unexpected, perplexing, surreal, and outside-the-box. Use the diagram provided to map your idea & objects/place/time/etc. so that you have concrete photographable ideas.


Arthur Tress article. CLICK HERE. 

24 October 2016

PROJ#10: PUDDLES & REFLECTIONS

DIRECTIONS: Make 24+ photographs that include a puddle. Reflections, silhouetted reflection, ripples, staged, not staged, upside down, right side up, combinations of all...are all good. Make the thing in reflection something interesting. Possibly use the rule of thirds and/or leading lines. 

BE MINDFUL OF: White Balance, ISO, aperture setting (f-Stop) for desired depth of field.


 



18 October 2016

PROJ #9: AUTUMN LEAVES (Digital)

DIRECTIONS. Venture into the world and make photographs of autumn leaves. How you arrange and compose your photos is open to your interpretation. You may go about the project as a straight-forward landscape project. ...Or, you could collect leaf textures using macro settings. You can approach it like a still life project: arranging thing leaves as objects. Or you could think conceptually, and approach it like the environmental artist Andy Goldsworthy (click here for Andy).

REMEMBER:
1. Set the ISO of your camera appropriately.
2. Set the WB of your camera appropriately.
3. Open the aperture wide (small f-stop number) for out of focus background.







4. Use macro function for close up textures.
OPTIONS: Composition and rule of thirds, balance and asymmetry, macro...

SITES.
Oregon fall foliage site. CLICK HERE.
Place suggestions. CLICK HERE.
Tips for shooting fall foliage. CLICK HERE.
Extra Crunchy tips for photographing fall foliage. CLICK HERE.

 

29 September 2016

READING AN IMAGE #2

Jonathan Bachman/Reuters
1. Post the image in your blog.
2. Using the Reading Photographs questions, choose one/two question from INTERPRET IT and one/two questions from EVALUATE IT.
3. Post your response to the photo in your blog.
**Don't forget to caption the photo with the name of the photographer and the news agency as it is here on this page.

Reading One. click here.
Reading Two. click here.

22 September 2016

READING AN IMAGE #1

Steve McCurry

Reply with two questions from each category on the Reading Photographs w/s.

PROJ#6: Unidentifiable Terrestrial Objects (Mystery Macro)

Make 10+ photographs of things.
Photograph these things in such a way that when we see the image we (the viewer) cannot identify the thing.

Develop and post these photos.

Title the post “Unidentifiable Terrestrial Objects/Mystery Macro”

HW: Make 10+ more images, and bring to next class. 

20 September 2016

PROJ#5: OUT OF FOCUS FOREGROUND FRAMING (Photos w/depth of field)

DIRECTIONS.
1. Put your camera into APERTURE mode.
2. Set your aperture as WIDE as it will go (meaning: small f-stop number)

-adjust your ISO & SHUTTER speed as necessary for the correct EXPOSURE.

3. Make your photo with something in the foreground that is out of focus. We should feel as if we are looking through/past something -- to what you have told us (through focus) is your main subject matter.

4. HW: Make 15+ images for next class

NOTE.
Be mindful of composition (rule of thirds, leading lines, etc.)

Here is a site for reference. CLICK HERE.
Here is a site for reference. CLICK HERE.

16 September 2016

PROJ#4: FORCED PERSPECTIVE (10+)

CLICK HERE.



WHAT IS IT?
Forced perspective is a technique which employs optical illusion to make an object appear farther away, closer, larger or smaller than it actually is. It manipulates human visual perception through the use of scaled objects and the correlation between them and the vantage point of the spectator or camera. 

DIRECTIONS:
Using the classtime photos you made as a starting point, make 10+ more forced perspective images for next class (9/20).



08 September 2016

PROJ #1: (dramatic/distinct) LIGHT & SHADOW

HW: 20+ photographs of distinct & dramatic LIGHT and SHADOW in your daily life over the next four days.

-Approach the project as a “street” photography assignment.
-Use the RULE OF THIRDS compositional tool
-Place the LIGHT OR SHADOW you want to be the main focal point in one of the intersections.

To-Do:
-Identify the direction of your light source.
-Place your main subject matter in an intersection of the rule of thirds.
-Magic hour?

REASONS for PHOTOGRAPHY.

These four questions will help me understand your perception and beliefs about photography, and in turn, help me educate you.

1. How would you describe photography to someone who didn't know what it was?
2. How is photography used in our world? What purpose does it serve?
3. What about photography inspired you to return for Photo 2?
4. List one thing that you would like to do this semester.

and one more question...just because we can...
5. If you were put on a desert island with only three songs/artists/albums to listen to for the rest of your days, what would they be?

01 June 2016

DEVELOPING: HOLGA SIMULATION SPECTACULAR (In-class tutorial)

DIRECTIONS:
1. Use EIGHT+ photos.
2. Add a light leak (or few) as explained in class.
3. Add a photo texture from a search you do for "photo texture." Make sure to use a high resolution image of texture.
4. For a few of the EIGHT+ photos, add a traditional photo border (Do a search for "polaroid transfer border," "old photo border," "rough photo border")
5. When you add a TEXTURE/LIGHT LEAK/BORDER, change the BLEND MODE the border/texture/light leak layer to the appropriate mode.

NOTE: You may need/want to ERASE parts of the textures if they cover important parts of your photo.


Light leak example.
Photo texture example.
Old photo border example. 



TEXTURE LINKS (or do a search of your own):

CLICK HERE.
CLICK HERE.
CLICK HERE.

BORDER LINKS (or do a search of your own):
CLICK HERE.
Paul Reynold's free borders. CLICK HERE.

OLD FILM TEXTURE/BORDER

PROJECT #13D: LIGHT BOX/STILL LIFE (Water)

Make 10+ photos of water (photographed using your light box).
Think outside the box (pun intended ;) for what/how you can make water interested.
Bring photos to next class.



Maybe you'd like to try this. CLICK HERE.